Day Program

This mission of the proposed Culinary Arts Program is to prepare students for employment in commercial and institutional positions in the culinary industry and to provide the foundational skills for those who wish to take their passion for cooking to the next level of expertise, skill and knowledge.

Holistic specifically refers to regarding an individual on all their levels:  physically; mentally/emotionally; and spiritually.  The Holistic approach to massage rejects the traditional idea of mere treatment of the individual as limited to soft tissue manipulation and incorporates recognized concepts of holistic care.  Students learn to develop and provide services that treat the entire client within the scope of their training - now expanded beyond the orthodox idea of a sole physical dimension.

The Associate of Science Degree and Certificate Programs in Massage Therapy both provide theory and practical experience to prepare graduates to take the National Certification Examination for Massage and Bodywork required for licensure as a Massage Therapist by the third semester, if the student wishes.

To take any hands-on course, students must be matriculated into the degree program in massage therapy at Nashua Community College or another institution; or already be a licensed therapist.

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN HOLISTIC MASSAGE THERAPY
FIRST YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
ENGL101N College Composition 4 0 4
MASS101N Swedish Massage I 2 3 3
MASS102N A & P for Massage and Bodywork 3 2 4
General Education Core:  History/Political Science 3 0 3
        14
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
MASS111N Musculo-Skeletal Study 1 2 2
MASS121N Swedish Massage II 2 3 3
MASS131N Pathology 3 0 3
MASS141N Oriental Theory and Concepts 3 0 3
MASSxxxN Massage/Wellness Elective 2 0 2
General Education Core:  Behavioral Social Science 3 0 3
        16
SECOND YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
MASS212N Kinesiology 2 3 3
MASS126N Massage Therapy Rules & Ethics 1 0 1
MASS233N Clinical Evaluation and Treatment 2 3 3
MASS135N Deep Tissue Massage 1 2 2
MASS119N Massage Business Practices 3 0 3
MASSxxxN Massage/Wellness Electives (2 or 3 courses)     6
        18
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
CHWN101N Foundations of Health and Wellness 3 0 3
General Education Core: English/Communications 3 0 3
MATH103N Topics in Applied College Mathematics - OR -      
General Education Core:  Quantitative Literacy 3 0 3/4
General Education:  Elective 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Humanities/Fine Arts OR Global Awareness 3 0 3
MASS290N Clinical Internship: A Capstone Experience 0 9 3
        18/19
Total 66/67 Credits

Program Outcomes

Upon the completion of the degree in Holistic Massage Therapy, graduates will be able to:

  1. Discuss the scope, definition, history and approaches of holistic massage therapy as compared to other health professionals.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the human body systems as understood by Western and Asian/Eastern sciences.
  3. Understand and show knowledge of anatomy (structure and/or location), physiology (function), pathology (disease) and kinesiology (movement.)
  4. Explain and apply Asian concepts, principles and approaches to the body including Traditional Chinese Medicine, meridian systems and Five Element theory.
  5. Understand and apply therapeutic massage and bodywork assessment methods.
  6. Construct and implement a massage session plan for each client using theory (physiological, emotional/psychological, energetic), methods, tools and techniques (strokes) of therapeutic massage therapy.
  7. Show understanding of professional standards, ethics, boundary setting, business and legal practices in massage.
  8. Demonstrate the ability to use computer information technology to gather resource information, organize business bookkeeping records and help maintain client notes and documentation.
  9. Use effective interpersonal skills to model listening, nurturing, genuine concern and empathy critical to touch therapy.
  10. Demonstrate proficiency in client interviewing, record keeping and oral communication.

Day/Evening program

The Associate in Arts Degree in Teacher Education offered by Nashua Community College is designed to prepare students to work as certified Paraeducators or totransfer to Teacher Education Programs at four-year colleges and universities.

The Teacher Education program has been designed using the NH Department of Education Professional Preparation Educator Programs standards and the recommendations of the NH Task Force on Effective Teaching.  The degree establishes requirements in three areas:

1) general education;

2) teacher education; and

3) a major area of concentration.

The general education area is a coherent and substantive balance in English and literature, science, mathematics, social science, and humanities/arts/world language.  Teacher education courses for area two are designed first to help students determine if teaching is a career of interest; to provide beginning knowledge, skills and dispositions of effective teachers as they prepare to transfer to four-year institutions; and to offer the entry level courses which transfer to most four-year colleges/universities.  At the beginning of their Teacher Education program all students should also select a major area of concentration from one of the following areas: Humanities, Fine Arts, Social sciences, mathematics, or sciences or an interdisciplinary program.  

Field-based experiences are required in all Teacher Education courses.  Students are expected to provide their own transportation to these sites.  Professional language, behavior and dress are expected at all sites.  Students must demonstrate that they have sufficient social, emotional, and physical ability to respond quickly and appropriately to unexpected student and classroom situations.  Additional Technical Skills are identified on page 84. 

Students should be advised that laws require those working in a public school setting be free of criminal convictions and be fingerprinted as outlined in RSA189:13.  There may be a fee for fingerprinting for NCC Teacher Education students prior to beginning school observations. 

NCC Students are required to pass the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators prior to graduation.  Electives should be taken that assure students are able to meet this requirement.  Students should be aware that GPA requirements for admissions to four-year Teacher Education programs are generally 2.5 or higher. 

Because each four-year institution has unique requirements for its Teacher Education program, it is imperative that, early in their college career, students consider to which institutions they may wish to transfer to be prepared with the appropriate course requirements for transfer.  Students should contact NCC Academic Advising or the Coordinator of Teacher Education to be sure their planned program will prepare them for their futures.  

An interview with the Education Department Chair is required for admission into the program.

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS TEACHER EDUCATION CONCENTRATION
FIRST YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
EDU130N Foundations of Education 3 0 3
ENGL101N College Composition 4 0 4
PSYC101N Introduction to Psychology 3 0 3
EDU131N Teaching with Technology 2 2 3
General Education Core:  Humanities/Fine Arts OR Global Awareness (see advisor) 3 0 3
  16
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
EDU132N Introduction to Exceptionalities 3 0 3
General Education Core:  English/Communications (200 level Literature course recommended) 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Quantitative Literacy (Statistics course recommended) 4 0 4
General Education Core:  History/Political Science (see advisor) 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Humanities/Fine Arts OR Global Awareness (see advisor)
  16
SECOND YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
EDU240N Creating Positive Learning Environments 3 0 3
PSYC201N Human Growth and Development 3 0 3
General Education Core: Science (must have a lab component) 3 2 4
General Education Core:  Humanities/Fine Arts OR Global Awareness (see advisor) 3 0 3
Elective: Major Concentration 3 0 3
  16
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
EDU295N Elementary Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment OR      
EDU296N Secondary Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Quantitative Literacy (MATH110N or higher recommended) 4 0 4
General Education Core: Science (must have a lab component) 3 1 4
Elective: Major Concentration 3 0 3
Elective: Major Concentration 3 0 3
  17
Total Credits 65

Notes: Expectations for four-year institutions vary.  Students should investigate their future choice(s) in four-year institutions to determine elective coursework and meet with an advisor to discuss all course selections. Course selections should prepare students to pass Praxis Core of Academic Skills for Educators prior to graduation.  For assistance, contact Academic Advising or the Coordinator for Teacher Education.

Students are advised to contact transfer institutions in order to make appropriate elective course selections. Please check with academic advisor prior to registering.

*Sciences with a laboratory component must be elected. In some transfer programs sequential science courses may be required. Other transfer programs require courses be taken from a variety science disciplines.
**Students will select concentration courses as recommended by their academic advisor transfer institution to prepare the student for a major focus after transfer.

Program Outcomes

Upon the completion of the degree in Teacher Education, graduates will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an awareness of and a beginning understanding of the teaching profession in regard to its historical context, the implications of the profession, and the role played by public education in contemporary society.
  2. Articulate a beginning philosophy of education that incorporates an understanding of relevant theories and models of education.
  3. Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and appreciation of the general education areas of literature, science, mathematics, social sciences, and humanities/fine arts/world language.
  4. Demonstrate college level proficiency in written and oral communication, and analytical, mathematical, and scientific reasoning that support the effective use and application of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required in the program and needed for transfer to a four-year degree institution.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of self and a general understanding of the human condition that promotes an appreciation for diversity, historical context, exceptionalities, and aesthetic sensitivity.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to make informed decisions in regard to an in-depth study in a particular area based on the student’s chosen goals, teaching field, and the need for continued learning.

Evening program

Communication is one of the most critical elements of human existence. The Associate in Science Degree program for Speech-Language Pathology Assistants prepares students to work with individuals who have communication disorders under the supervision of an ASHA-certified, state-licensed speech-language pathologist. Graduates from this program are eligible for certification through the NH Office of Licensed Allied Health Professions.

The role of the speech-language pathologist has expanded beyond service provision to include administrative, managerial, and supervisory responsibilities. The appropriate use of speech- language pathology assistants is one means to meet the demands and to extend service delivery to persons with communication disorders in a cost-efficient fashion. Job opportunities for speech- language pathology assistants (SLPAs) are growing with the increased demand for speech-language pathologists. Most current positions in New Hampshire are within school districts, although the opportunity for employment in health care settings is growing.

The Speech-Language Pathology Assistant Program at NCC has been designed following the American Speech-Hearing-Language Association’s Guidelines for the Training, Use, and Supervision of Speech-Language Pathology Assistants.

Students are advised that public schools, nursing homes and rehabilitation facilities require a criminal background check before allowing students to participate in learning experiences at their locations. Students are responsible for any fees that may be incurred in meeting this requirement.

The College must ensure that students in the program do not put themselves or anyone else in jeopardy during classroom observations, participation in fieldwork activities, or Service Learning experiences. Therefore, students must demonstrate sufficient emotional and physical ability to respond quickly and appropriately to unexpected events. In addition, speech-language pathology assistant students need to have excellent communication skills (verbal and non-verbal), empathy, tolerance, patience and creativity. Furthermore, students are expected to have the emotional stability required to exercise sound judgment, accept direction and guidance from a supervisor or faculty member, and establish rapport and maintain sensitive interpersonal relationships with students/patients/clients, their families, agency staff, faculty, and classmates.

Attendance at classes and clinical experiences is expected.

An interview with the Speech-Language Pathology Program Coordinator is required for admission into the program. Applicants to the program must meet the general requirements for admission to the College as well.

The mission of the Speech-Language Pathology Assistant Program is:

  • To prepare post-secondary students to ethically and competently assist in the practice of speech-language pathology under the direction and supervision of a state-licensed, ASHA-certified Speech-Language Pathologist.
  • To provide a base in scientific and cultural foundations of a liberal education.
  • To help students be productive and contributing members of society.
  • To promote life-long learning through the acquisition of values, skills, and attitudes beneficial to both themselves and others.

Applicants to the program must meet the general requirements for admission to the College and maintain a C or above in all Speech-Language Pathology Assistant courses in order to enroll in SLPN291 SLPA Practicum I, SLPN292 SLPA Practicum II or SLPN290 Seminar.

 Technical Standards: Please refer to Technical Standards Section 10 for details regarding this program.

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
in SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY ASSISTANT
FIRST YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
ENGL101N College Composition 4 0 4
General Education Core:  Quantitative Literacy 4 0 4
BCPT101N Computer Technology and Applications 2 2 3
SLPN114N Survey of Communication Disorders (2nd half of semester)* 3 0 3
SLPN111N Speech & Language Development (1st half of semester) 3 0 3
  17
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
PSYC101N Introduction to Psychology 3 0 3
EDU206N Learning and Behavior* 3 0 3
SLPN112N Anatomy & Physiology of Speech & Hearing Mechanism (1st half-semester) 3 0 3
SLPN121N Language Disorders (2nd half of semester)* 3 0 3
General Education Core: English/Communications 3 0 3
  15
SUMMER SEMESTERCLLABCR
SLPN115N Phonetics (1st half of semester) 3 0 3
SLPN123N Disorders of Articulation (2nd half of semester )* 3 0 3
SLPN210N Communication Aspects of Autism Spectrum Disorders* - OR -      
XXXXxxx Open Elective 3 0 3
  9
SECOND YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
PYSC201N Human Growth and Development 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Humanities/Fine Arts OR Global Awareness 3 0 3
General Education Core:  History/Political Science  3 0 3
SLPN220N Advanced Communication Disorders (1st half of semester)* 3 0 3
SLPN221N Clinical Procedures in Speech−Language Pathology (2nd half of semester)* 3 0 3
  15
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
General Education Core:  Science (must have a lab) 3 2 4
General Education: Open Elective 3 0 3
SLPN290N Capstone Seminar in Communication Disorders* 2 0 2
SLPN291N Speech-Language Pathology Assistant Practicum I (1st half semester)* 0 3 1
SLPN292N Speech-Language Pathology Assistnat Practicum II (2nd half semester)* 0 6 2
  12
Total 68 Credits
*Please check course descriptions for prerequisites for these courses.
Program Outcomes

Program Outcomes

Upon the completion of the degree in Speech-Language Pathology Assistant, graduates will be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively and professionally, both orally and in writing, with children or adults and their families, as well as colleagues, supervisors, and other professionals, while always directing inquiries for clinical information to the supervising speech-language pathologist.
  2. Demonstrate comprehension of and skill utilizing a variety of research methods and scientific inquiry in order to evaluate information critically.
  3. Apply the logic of mathematical reasoning and demonstrate proficiency in computational methods and mathematical concepts and applications.
  4.  Apply critical thinking skills to solve problems, to evaluate arguments and chains of reasoning, and to interpret information.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to use contemporary information technology to gather information resources for personal and professional obligations.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of and reasoning ability about contemporary ethical issues and values.
  7. Describe developmental patterns of the acquisition of sounds, words, grammatical and syntactical forms, semantics, the receptive and expressive use of language and pragmatic skills.
  8. Demonstrate understanding of the basic etiology and symptomology of communication disorders, including developmental delays, voice, language, articulation, phonology, fluency, neurological impairment and hearing impairment.
  9. Identify various language and cultural diversities and demonstrate awareness and understanding of student/patient/client needs and cultural values.
  10. Describe the general principles of therapeutic intervention and identify the scope, the roles, and major issues of therapy in a variety of settings, age/grade levels, types of treatment, and supervision models used as related to speech and language therapy.
  11. Follow documented individual education plans or protocols (IEPs, IFSPs) developed by the supervising speech-language pathologist as well as plan and implement therapy for specific, common problems under the direct supervision of a speech-language pathologist.
  12. Document student/patient/client performance (e.g., tallying data for the speech-language pathologist to use; preparing charts, records, and graphs) and report this information to the supervising speech-language pathologist.
  13. Write clear and concise reports of treatment sessions.
  14. Exhibit compliance with regulations, reimbursement requirements, and the speech-language pathology assistant’s job responsibilities.

Day Program

The mission of the Hospitality and Restaurant Management Program is to provide both academic preparation and practical experiences that students need to enter and succeed in a hospitality management career.  In addition, the program prepares students for transfer to four-year colleges and universities that offer a bachelor degree in a hospitality-related program.

The hospitality industry currently represents the second largest employer in the United States, and the industry is the major part of a rapidly-growing services sector of the economy. To meet the need for college-educated professionals in the hospitality field, the Associate Degree program in Hospitality and Restaurant Management focuses on a business education and theories of hospitality management that provide graduates with an understanding of the key areas of the industry.

As a key element of the program, students are required to complete a supervised 120 hour internship at a hotel, restaurant, or other approved hospitality organization.

Many exciting career opportunities exist within the hospitality industry. The following examples serve to show the variety of exciting positions that may be pursued depending on experience and interest: front office manager; sales or marketing manager; executive housekeeper; food and beverage manager; banquet manager; restaurant manager; events manager; human resources manager; or hotel manager.

Internship Considerations: Please refer to Technical Standards/ Internship Considerations section of the College Catalog for details regarding this program. 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
in HOSPITALITY AND RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
FIRST YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
ENGL101N College Composition 4 0 4
BCPT101N Computer Technology and Applications 2 2 3
ACCT101N Financial Accounting 4 1 4
HOS101N Introduction to Hospitality 3 0 3
FYE101N First Year Experience 1 0 1
  15
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
BUS104N Principles of Marketing 3 0 3
BUS110N Principles of Management 3 0 3
HOS110N Front Office Operations/Revenue 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Science 3 2 4
General Education Core:  Behavioral Social Sciene 3 0 3
XXXxxxN Open Elective 3 0 3
  19
SECOND YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
ENGL109N Oral Communication 3 0 3
HOS201N Hospitality Sales and Marketing 3 0 3
HOS210N Principles of Food and Beverage Management 3 0 3
MATH103N Topics in Applied College Mathematics 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Humanities/Fine Arts OR Global Awareness 3 0 3
  15
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
BUS240N Business Law 3 0 3
ECON201N Microeconomics - OR -      
General Education:  Group D Elective 3 0 3
HOS211N Bar and Beverage Management 3 0 3
HOS290N Hospitality and Restaurant Management Internship 1 8 3
General Education:  Open Elective 3 0 3
  15
Total 64 credits

Program Outcomes

Upon the completion of the degree in Hospitality and Restaurant Management, graduates will be able to:

  1. Describe a hospitality business philosophy.
  2. Utilize computer technology appropriate to the industry.
  3. Describe the building of a brand positioning statement.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the sales and marketing skills appropriate for the hospitality industry.
  5. Demonstrate appropriate personal skills for the hospitality industry. including professional business etiquette and ethics.
  6. Apply basic principles of supervisory managemen.t
  7. Implement basic operations of a hospitality enterprise.
  8. Appreciate and understand the value of diversity. 
  9. Communicate effectively in a diverse society using visual and written modes within the hospitality industry.
  10. Critically reflect on the impact that historical and contemporary culture has on society in general and specifically in the hospitality industry.
  11. Apply critical-thinking skills to arrive at reasoned decisions in solving everyday hospitality industry issues.
  12. Demonstrate effective research and reporting skills.

The mission of the Department of Nursing at Nashua Community College is to provide students the opportunity to earn an Associate in Science in Nursing, which prepares them to take the licensing exam (NCLEX-RN) to become Registered Nurses, for employment in entry-level positions in nursing, and for further education and professional development.

Admission to the Associate in Science in Nursing Program

Applicants seeking admission to the Associate in Science in Nursing Program must meet all general admission requirements of the College, attend a Nursing information session as well as provide evidence of the following:

  • High school or college credits in biology, algebra, chemistry, and English with grade of C or better.

  • High performance on the Test of Essential Academic Skills V (TEAS V). The TEAS V is a standardized admission test from Assessment Technologies Institute™ (ATI). Test performance is measured relative to the applicant pool, by a minimum score over the fiftieth percentile in each of the subcategories on the test. The test subcategories are: Reading, Math, Science, and English/Language Usage. (see www.atitesting.com for more information about preparing for this test).

  • Two letters of professional reference on forms provided by the College.

  • Ability to meet the Health, Character, and Technical Standards for the ASN Program (please see below).

  • An applicant who has attended another nursing education program within the past five years must also submit a letter of reference from the director of the nursing program at the previous school.

  • Nursing program applications must be completed by January 31st to be considered for acceptance in the fall class.

  • Applicants meeting the above requirements will be ranked according to TEAS scores and previous college grade in Anatomy and Physiology I, using a point ranking system. TEAS V Science category scores over the 60th percentile rank will receive an additional point on the admission ranking scale.

General Admission Requirements

  • High School transcript or GED

  • Application form with non-refundable $20.00 fee

  • Take Accuplacer if required

ESOL Applicants

ESOL applicants must attain a minimum score of 83 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL iBT) as advised by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (www.ncsbn.org).

Selection Criteria

Preference will be given to applicants who:

  • Are New Hampshire residents.

  • Have a greater number of non-nursing courses completed relative to the applicant pool.

  • Attain higher scores relative to the applicant pool on the TEAS V and TOEFL iBT (if required), using the admission ranking scale.

  • Attain higher scores relative to the applicant pool on the TEAS V and TOEFL iBT (if required), and in previous coursework.

  • Demonstrate relatively balanced strengths in Reading, Math, Science, and English on the TEAS V.

  • Have a history of academic and / or work success.

  • Submit a satisfactory background check when directed by a letter of conditional acceptance to the nursing program.

  • Have basic experience in health-related employment.

Admission decisions will be made by the Vice President of Student Services and the Chairperson of the Department of Nursing. Enrollment capacity is limited and admission is competitive. Qualified students who are not accepted in the initial selection process may be assigned to a prioritized waiting list based on the above criteria. They may be subsequently admitted if an opening becomes available prior to the beginning of the fall semester. The waiting list will be discarded once classes begin. Students still desiring admission must then reapply following the above procedure. Highly qualified students who have taken few or no non-nursing courses may be offered admission to a three-year program of study.

Transfer Credit
Transcripts of previous college credits may be submitted to be evaluated for transferability. Science and Nursing credits must be no more than five years old with a minimum grade of B-.

Licensed Practical Nurses

  • Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) with college credits in nursing completed in the past five years and with current nursing practice may be able to challenge by exam up to eight credits in nursing.

  • Other college courses may be evaluated for transferability.

  • The LPN may earn 4 credits applicable to NURN130 by taking the ATI Fundamentals of Nursing exam and scoring a minimum of Level 2. Satisfactory performance on a simulated patient care experience in the nursing laboratory may earn 4 credits applicable to NURN120. * The LPN applicant must request ATI exam for advanced standing by May 1 in order to be exempt from NURN120 and 130.

  • Graduates of practical nursing programs who meet criteria for admission to the Associate in Science in Nursing Program and have not yet taken NCLEX-PN may be considered.

  • All general admission requirements of the College and admission requirements to the nursing program must be met, including scores from the Test of Essential Academic Skills.

Health, Character, and Technical Standards

Technical standards have been established to inform the student of minimum standards needed to satisfactorily function in the program and ultimately in the profession. Applicants who feel they may not be able to meet one or more of the technical standards listed below should contact program officials to discuss individual cases. All academically qualified candidates will be considered for admission provided the technical standards for classroom and clinical experiences can be met with reasonable accommodations.

The College must ensure that patients / clients of clinical affiliates are not placed in jeopardy by students during learning experiences. Therefore, students in service learning and clinical experiences must demonstrate sufficient emotional stability to withstand the stresses, uncertainties, and rapidly changing circumstances that characterize the responsibilities of patient / client care. Furthermore, the student is expected to have the emotional stability required to exercise sound judgment, accept direction and guidance from a supervisor or faculty member, and establish rapport and maintain sensitive interpersonal relationships with patients, their families, agency staff, faculty, and classmates.

Applicants must be in good physical and mental health to meet program objectives.  Attendance at classes and clinical experiences is expected.  An additional clinical fee may be charged for any clinical make up time.  Students are expected to provide their own transportation to all clinical experiences. Technical standards are listed below.

  1. Sufficient hearing to assess patient needs, physiological signs, understand instructions, identify emergency signals, assess body functions, and engage in telephone conversation.

  2. Sufficient visual acuity to observe patients, manipulate equipment, interpret data, ensure a safe environment, identify color changes, read fine print / writing, and do fine calibrations.

  3. Sufficient speech and language ability to express, comprehend, and exchange information and ideas in English verbally, non-verbally, and in writing, and to interact clearly and logically with patients, family members, physicians, nurses, faculty, peers, and other ancillary medical personnel.

  4. Sufficient tactile ability to assess pressure, temperature, position, vibration, and movement.

  5. Ability to work with frequent interruptions, to respond appropriately in emergencies or unexpected situations, and to cope with extreme variations in workload and stress levels.

  6. Sufficient emotional intelligence to exhibit empathy and compassion, to maintain productive relationships in classroom and clinical settings, and to integrate direction, instruction, and criticism into behavioral changes.

  7. Sufficient strength, endurance, and motor coordination to perform the following physical activities: participation in lengthy classroom activities; fine and gross motor skills to carry out procedures; ability to safely and frequently handle, lift, and/or carry equipment and patients up to thirty pounds; stamina to complete an eight to twelve hour work shift; and ability to perform CPR.

  8. Sufficient information technology skills to complete assignments according to program standards.

  9. Applicants with latex allergies are advised to seek professional medical consultation.

Upon Acceptance

It is understood that acceptance is conditional upon submission of satisfactory evidence in the form of the following documents no later than August 1st.

  • Evidence of current health status (student health form).

  • A transcript demonstrating the completion of the completion of SCIN201 Anatomy and Physiology I with a minimum grade of B- and PSYN 101 Introduction to Psychology.

  • Immunity or immunization against measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), varicella, hepatitis B, and Tdap. Annual influenza immunization is required for all nursing students.

  • Two-year certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at the healthcare provider level (American Heart Association, CPR for the Professional Rescuer).

  • Mantoux testing to assess for prior tuberculosis exposure.

  • Personal medical insurance. Students are responsible for obtaining and maintaining current accident/health insurance and must provide documentation of insurance coverage yearly. If health insurance information changes during the academic year, the student must notify the department of nursing immediately.

In Addition:

  • A fee for nursing liability insurance will be assessed in the second semester tuition bill. Additional fees apply for nursing students. These may include but are not limited to: Assessment Technologies Institute® (ATI) testing package, Criminal Background Check Fees and DocuCare Electronic Medical Record (EMR) software license fee.

  • Additional requirements include uniform, stethoscope, watch with a second hand, textbooks, skills lab kit and supplies for lab practice, and testing materials. There will also be occasional fees for field trips, as well as for end-of-program activities and licensure. A list of additional costs for the program is available upon request.

  • The Background Check, which may include drug/alcohol screening, is due within thirty days of receipt of conditional acceptance. Instructions will be provided. Random or pre-clinical drug/alcohol screening may occur at any point throughout the program. The cost of any drug/alcohol testing is borne by the student.

Criminal / Legal Records

Licensing regulations differ among states and may restrict licensure of applicants who have been involved in civil or criminal legal proceedings. Questions about licensing restrictions should be addressed to the New Hampshire Board of Nursing, 121 South Fruit Street, Suite 16, Concord, NH 03301 or to the Board of Nursing in the state in which licensure is desired. An annual Background Check which may include drug screening may be required prior to attendance at clinical agencies. Please contact the Board of Nursing in the state in which practice is planned regarding licensure requirements, since there are differences among states. Completion of the program does not guarantee RN licensure.

Criteria for Progression in the Program

The curriculum includes a general education component that supports courses in nursing. Students must earn a minimum grade of B- in Anatomy and Physiology I and II, Microbiology, Human Growth and Development, and in all nursing courses in order to progress in the program. Courses in nursing are taken sequentially and most of them include a clinical component. Degree requirements must be completed within five years of entering the first nursing course. Students must anticipate a schedule of three to five days a week for the nursing courses with a possibility of evening clinical assignments. Employment of more than twenty hours per week is discouraged due to the commitment required for success in the program. Many students choose to take most or all of the non-nursing courses prior to beginning the first course in nursing. Students who do not meet criteria for progression may seek re-entry at the point of last success on a space-available basis. A student may be granted only one opportunity to re-enter the program.

Continuing Education

Graduates of the program are encouraged to earn the Bachelor and/or Master of Science in Nursing. Articulation agreements are maintained with Franklin Pierce University, Granite State College, Plymouth State College, Rivier University, Southern NH University, St. Anselm’s College and St. Joseph College of Maine.  Students planning to continue their education toward the Bachelor’s or Masters of Science in Nursing should plan their program of study with an academic advisor from the Department of Nursing. Further information can be obtained from the respective programs or from the Chair of the Department of Nursing.

Upon completion of the degree in Nursing, graduates will be able to:

  1. Plan and deliver safe individualized care to patients by integrating the nursing process and pertinent nursing knowledge, principles of teaching / learning, and preferences of patients or legal designees across the lifespan, diversity of culture, and the levels of prevention.

  2. Practice collaboratively on the multi-professional health care team using principles of leadership across the disciplines and throughout the health care system to influence and facilitate conflict resolution and the establishment and achievement of shared goals.

  3. Support a culture of continuous quality improvement by using data to monitor outcomes; identifying and reporting actual or potential problems; collaborating with the multi-professional team throughout the health care system; and developing evidence-based strategies for optimal practice.

  4. Use health care system resources and technology, including information technology, time, policies and procedures, materials, and equipment, to coordinate and deliver individual and / or population-focused care that is effective and efficient.

  5. Communicate clearly in goal-oriented, culturally-sensitive, caring, concise, and timely ways using written, verbal, non-verbal, and electronic modalities.

  6. Demonstrate accountability for professional practice using legal, ethical, and regulatory guidelines and participate in activities that contribute to life-long learning.

Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN)
3343 Peachtree Road NE
Suite 850
Atlanta, Georgia 30326
P. 404.975.5000
F. 404.975.5020
Website: www.acenursing.org

NURSING (2 Year Curriculum Plan)

Prerequisite:  for NURS120N and NURS130N:
    CL LAB CR
BIOL130N Anatomy & Physiology I 3 3 4
PSYC101N Introduction to Psychology 3 0 3
        7
FIRST YEAR - FALL SEMESTER
ENGL101N College Composition I 4 0 4
BIOL131N Anatomy & Physiology II 3 3 4
PSYC201N Human Growth and Development 3 0 3
NURS120N Fundamental Nursing Skills 0 12 4
NURS130N Concepts for Nursing Practice 3 0 3
        18
SPRING SEMESTER
NURS140N Nursing Care I:  Concepts and Skills 4 12 8
NURS230N Pharmacology for Nursing Practice 3 0 3
BIOL210N Foundations for Microbiology 3 3 4
General Education Core: Quantitative Literacy (MATH106N preferred) 4 0 4
        19
SECOND YEAR - FALL SEMESTER
NURS220N Nursing Care II:  Concepts and Skills 4 18 10
General Education Core:  English/Communications 3 0 3
        13
SPRING SEMESTER
NURS240N Management of Nursing Care Across the Lifespan 4 15 9
General Elective Core:  Humanities/Fine Arts OR Global Awareness 3 0 3
        13
Total 69 Credits

NURSING (3 Year Curriculum Plan)

FIRST YEAR - FALL SEMESTER
BIOL130N Anatomy & Physiology I 3 3 4
ENGL101 College Composition I 4 0 4
General Education Core:  Quantitative Literacy (MATH106N preferred) 4 0 4
        12
SPRING SEMESTER
BIOL131N Anatomy & Physiology II 3 3 4
PSYC101N Introduction to Psychology 3 0 3
General Education Core:  English/Communications 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Humanities/Fine Arts OR Global Awareness 3 0 3
      13
SUMMER
BIOL210N Foundations in Microbiology 3 3 4
        4
SECOND YEAR - FALL SEMESTER
PSYC201N Human Growth and Development 3 0 3
NURS120N Fundamental Nursing Skills 0 12 4
NURS130N Concepts for Nursing Practice 3 0 3
        10
SPRING SEMESTER
NURS140N Nursing Care I:  Concepts and Skills 4 12 8
NURS230N Pharmacology for Nursing Practice 3 0 3
        11
THIRD YEAR - FALL SEMESTER
NURS220N Nursing Care II:  Concepts and Skills 4 18 10
        10
SPRING SEMESTER
NURS240N Management of Nursing Care Across the Lifespan 4 15 9
        9
Total 69 Credits
 
Nursing Application Checklist
Nursing Reference Forms
TEAS V Testing Schedule TBA
 

Program Outcomes

Upon completion of the degree in Nursing, graduates will be able to:

  1. Plan and deliver safe individualized care to patients by integrating the nursing process and pertinent nursing knowledge, principles of teaching / learning, and preferences of patients or legal designees across the lifespan, diversity of culture, and the levels of prevention.

  2. Practice collaboratively on the multi-professional health care team using principles of leadership across the disciplines and throughout the health care system to influence and facilitate conflict resolution and the establishment and achievement of shared goals.

  3. Support a culture of continuous quality improvement by using data to monitor outcomes; identifying and reporting actual or potential problems; collaborating with the multi-professional team throughout the health care system; and developing evidence-based strategies for optimal practice.

  4. Use health care system resources and technology, including information technology, time, policies and procedures, materials, and equipment, to coordinate and deliver individual and / or population-focused care that is effective and efficient.

  5. Communicate clearly in goal-oriented, culturally-sensitive, caring, concise, and timely ways using written, verbal, non- verbal, and electronic modalities.

  6. Demonstrate accountability for professional practice using legal, ethical, and regulatory guidelines and participate in activities that contribute to life-long learning. 

Evening Program

Mechanical Design Technology responds to industry needs for trained individuals who can follow the design process from inspiration to the final production design of manufactured products. The Mechanical Design Technology program prepares specialists who are capable of integrating all the steps of the design process.

The mechanical designer requires knowledge in many areas including Computer Aided Drafting and Design, Machine Shop, Robotics and Machine Components.

Foundation courses will provide knowledge of physics, mathematics, machine shop practices, machine theory and robot automation programming. Subsequent courses build upon this basic knowledge to develop applications related to modern machine design.

To prepare students for the rapid pace of technological changes in the workplace, the Mechanical Design Technology program seeks to develop long-term sustainable design and problem-solving capabilities.

While manufacturing has had its struggles in recent years, demand is expected to be strong for mechanical designers as companies emphasize high-quality and safe products that are easy to use. High technology products in medicine, transportation, and other fields, and growing global competition among businesses are expected to keep designers busy.

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE in MECHANICAL DESIGN TECHNOLOGY
FIRST YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
CAD111 CADD 1 3 4 5
MTTN101 Manufacturing Processes 3 0 3
ENGL101 College Composition 4 0 4
MATH110 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 0 4
  16
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
CAD112N CADD II 3 4 5
MTTN118N Machining Technology 2 3 4
MDTN110N Automation Programming 3 1 3
PHYS130N Physics I - OR -      
PHYS101N Physical Science 3 2 4
  16
SECOND YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
CAD215N CADD III (Pro E) 3 6 5
ELET131N Circuit Analysis I 3 3 4
ELMT203N Applied Mechanics I 3 1 3
General Education Core:  English/Communications 3 0 3
General Education Core:  History/Political Science 3 0 3
  18
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
MDTN285N Design Capstone Project 3 2 4
ELMT204N Fluid Power Design 2 1 2
ELMT210N Applied Mechanics II 2 1 2
MTTN201N Lean and Green Manufacturing Methods 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Behavioral Social Science 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Humanities/Fine Arts OR Global Awareness 3 0 3
  17
Total 67 Credits
 

Program Outcomes

Upon the completion of the degree in Mechanical Design Technology, graduates will be able to:

  1. Evaluate, categorize and interpret technical information effectively.
  2. Generate engineering drawings that conform to current industry standards.
  3. Create three dimensional CAD models and assemblies that meet specific design criteria.
  4. Use three dimensional CAD models for strength and motion analysis, animation, machining and rapid prototyping processes. 
  5. Evaluate and specify economical and environmentally friendly manufacturing processes and materials for product development.
  6. Produce complete and comprehensive drawing packages as well as understand Engineering Change Order procedures.
  7. Develop, design and manufacture a socially responsible industrial product.
  8. Demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills to meet design and production deadlines.
  9. Perform basic automation programming, fluid power, machining, and electronics related tasks in a production or test environment.

Day/Evening program

At the heart of our mechanized world is the Precision Manufacturing industry requiring skilled technicians to carry out new ideas and plans in the production of all types of manufactured parts. Many of these skilled technicians can earn more than $50,000 a year.

Precision Manufacturing students receive applied training in basic concepts of machine tool processes during the first year.

In the second year, students will receive training in such specialized areas as production machining and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM), Computer Numerical Control (CNC) programming, setup and operation.

Employment opportunities include CNC specialists, mold makers, technical support technicians, field service representatives, and general machinists.

For students looking to pursue an education beyond the Associate Degree, this program may transfer to selected Bachelor Degree programs.

In addition to the general admission requirements, applicants should be aware of the following criteria:

  1. A minimum of high school Algebra I is recommended.
  2. Good skills in written English are required.
  3. Other high school courses such as physics and computer programming are recommended.
  4. It is recommended that senior students purchase a basic machinist tool kit.
PRECISION MANUFACTURING
FIRST YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
MTTN101N Manufacturing Processes 3 0 3
MTTN111N Machine Tool Processes & Theory I 3 9 7
ENGL101N College Composition 4 0 4
FYE101NN First Year Experience  1 0 1
MATH110N Algebra and Trigonometry -OR- 4 0 4
MATH105N Technical Mathematics 4 0 4
  19
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
MTTN122N Machine Tool Processes and Theory II 3 9 7
CAD131N Technical Drawing 2 3 3
MTTN123N Principles of CNC 2 3 3
General Education Core:  English/Communications 3 0 3
General Education Core: Science 4 0 4
  20
SECOND YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
MTTN231N Advanced MTP & Theory I 3 9 7
MTTN223N Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) 2 3 3
General Education Core:  Science 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Behavioral Social Science 3 0 3
  16
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
MTTN232N Advanced MTP & Theory II: A Capstone Experience 3 9 7
MTTN201N Lean and Green Manufacturing Methods 3 0 3
General Education Core:  History/Political Science 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Humanities/Fine Arts OR Global Awareness 3 0 3
  16
Total 71 Credits
*Machine Tool Tool List  
Program Outcomes  
**To view or print .pdf files you will need to download Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Program Outcomes

Upon the completion of the degree in Advanced Machine Tool Technology, the graduate will be able to:

  1. Analyze and interpret drawings using ANSI Y 14.5M (2009) standards of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GDT).
  2. Accurately measure parts using precision measuring tools to maintain quality control of machined parts.
  3. Explain casting, forging, welding, molding, heat treatment, powdered metal, and stamping manufacturing methods.
  4. Set-up and operate surface grinders, manual millers and manual lathes to produce parts to specifications.
  5. Identify and explain positioning systems, program formats and machine axes used on CNC machines.
  6. Set-up and operate CNC lathes and CNC millers necessary to produce parts to specification.
  7. Write programs and machine parts through the use of CAD-CAM software.
  8. Manually write basic CNC programs using G and M codes.
  9. Set-up and operate:  a cylindrical grinder and a ram type electrical discharge machine (EDM).
  10. Calculate stock requirements and specify and order materials and tools.
  11. Conduct oneself appropriately in a job interview.
  12. Manage a project involving machining, assembly and timely completion.
  13. Work cooperatively on a team project.
  14. Interpret Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS0 used in machining fluids and materials.
  15. Apply safety procedures appropriate to running a modern machine shop.
  16. Explain Statistical Process Control (SPS) and apply it appropriately.
  17. Design work holding fixtures and vise jaws to machine parts.
  18. Heat-treat tool steels and alloy steels to a specified Rockwell hardness
  19. Appropriately identify and use collets, chucks and work-holding devices.
  20. Identify and use appropriate cutting tool materials for a given application.
  21. Solve practical trigonometric problems related to the geometry of parts.
  22. Communicate effectively about maching problems and issues involved in the production of parts.
  23. Utilize principles of physics related to machines and machining.

Day/Evening Program

The Associate in Science Degree program in Human Services prepares students to work with individuals who are consumers of the human services delivery system, providing them with direct services and linking them with other community services and resources.

Graduates of the Human Services program may be employed in human services agencies which deal with developmental disabilities, mental health, residential treatment, hospice care, abuse prevention and substance abuse. Graduates will be prepared for employment in positions such as service coordinator, group home manager, job coach, vocational instructor and trainer, residential living counselor, community living instructor, program manager, site supervisor, supported or independent living specialist coordinator, and family support coordinator.

The job market for human service workers has experienced tremendous growth during the past twenty years, concurrent with the expansion of community based mental health and developmental disabilities programs for the elderly, the disabled and families in crises. Locally, employment growth in Hillsborough County is projected to be the fourth highest of all ten counties in New Hampshire. One of the fastest growing occupations in NH includes social and human service assistants, projected to increase by 43.4% over the next ten years. Entry level salaries with an associate degree can range from $27,000 to $35,000 with opportunities for overtime, tuition reimbursement and insurance coverage.

Transfer Agreements: Graduates wishing to pursue their bachelor's degree can benefit from our transfer agreements with Granite State College, Rivier College, and Springfield College of Human Services. Students may enroll into one of these programs after transferring credits earned at Nashua Community College.

All candidates are required to have a personal interview with a department faculty member. The College also offers a Certificate program in Human Services, providing students with the major courses required for entry level position, as well as providing them with an entry point for the continuation of studies. All Certificate courses have been incorporated into the first year of the Degree program.

Technical Standards have been established as guidance tools to inform program applicants of skills and standards necessary for successful completion of the Human Service programs. Any applicant who has concerns or questions regarding the Technical Standards is encouraged to contact the Department Chair to discuss their individual issues. Students in the Human Service programs must be able to demonstrate:

  • Ability to communicate verbally as a student in classes, and later as a professional in individual and group counseling situations;
  • Sufficient verbal skills and language to collaborate with a wide variety of helping professionals in clinical, societal and professional areas; deliver accurate and required information; and to search for information, e.g. questioning;
  • Sufficient writing ability to formulate written assessment, charting notes, and reports, etc.
  • Ability to sustain cognitive integrity in areas of short- and long-term memory, areas of written documentation and follow-through of responsibilities;
  • Ability to concentrate on the execution of treatment plans, assigned skills and tasks as well as the integration and communication of this work for both short- and long-term periods of time
  • Abiltiy to work in settings that may lend themselves to frequent interruptions, immediate crisis response and role responsibility exchange;
  • Ability to cope with a variety of stressors, including people-place occurances, and demonstrate safe and required care for individuals and the workplace as a whole;
  • Ability to secure transportation to practicum sites and classes;
  • Ability to consistently attend and participate in classes;
  • Ability to demonstrate and maintain organizational skills, time management and professional respect and conduct as a human service student, either at a practicum site, or in the community;
  • Ability to adhere to and practice the Human Service Department's ethical guidelines.

A State Police criminal check is the responsibility of students and may be required for clinical fieldwork and/or employment upon request of an agency.

Applicants who have had difficulty with the law depending on the nature of the problem may not be employable or even eligible for fieldwork. Applicants need to discuss these matters in an interview with the Department Chair to determine future direction.

Human Services/Community Social Services Scholarship
The NH Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Developmental Services through a cooperative agreement with the Community College System of NH (CCSNH), offers grants to students as tuition reimbursement towards a Community Social Services/Human Services Certificate at some of NH’s community college. The grants are available to any employee, family member or individual affiliated with one of ten area agencies and their vendors. Applications are available at any of the community colleges, and the students must have the support of an area agency representative. For information on this scholarship, visit http://www.ccsnh.edu/human-servicescommunity-social-services-scholarship or email Jayne Barnes at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN HUMAN SERVICES

FIRST YEAR - FALL SEMESTER
    CL LAB CR
ENGL101N College Composition 4 0 4
BCPT101N Computer Technology and Applications 2 2 3
PSYC101N Introduction to Psychology 3 0 3
HSV111N Introduction to Human Services 3 0 3
PSYC206N Learning and Behavior 3 0 3
        16
SPRING SEMESTER
HSV123N Supportive Communication Skills 3 0 3
General Education Core:  Behavioral Social Science 3 0 3
PSYC210N Abnormal Psychology 3 0 3
HSV190N Fieldwork I 1 8 3
MATH103N Topices in Applied College Mathematics OR      
General Education Core:  Quantitative Literacy* 3/4 0 3/4
        15/16
SECOND YEAR - FALL SEMESTER
ENGL102N Writing About Literature OR      
ENGL103N Professional Writing and Presentations 3 0 3
PSYC212N Individual Counseling:  Theory and Practice 3 0 3
PSYC240N Alcohol and Drugs 3 0 3
HSV290N Fieldwork II OR Open Elective 1 8 3
General Education Core:  Science (lab recommended) 3 0/2 3/4
General Education Core:  Humanities/Fine Arts OR Global Awareness* 3 0 3
        18/19
SPRING SEMESTER
HSV225N Family Supports 3 0 3
PSYC222N Group Dynamics and Counseling 3 0 3
General Education Core:  History/Political Science 3 0 3
HSV291N Capstone Experience 1 8 3
XXXxxxN Open Elective 3 0 3
        15

Total 65-66 Credits

Recommendations for Open Electives include Research Methods, Human Growth and Development, and Social Psychology.

*  Students are advised to meet with their advisor to make appropriate elective selections based on their career goals and to facilitate the broadest range of transferability. 
 

Suggested open electives may include Intro to Social Work, Research Methods or another Psychology elective.  Dropping from a required program course may mean that the student will be out of sequence in program course offerings which may delay graduation.  Students who begin the program in the spring semester or who need developmental course support should recognize that it may take longer to complete the program.  Individuals must recognize that to be successful in the Human Services field, they should be emotionally stable, creative and flexible.

Program Outcomes

Upon the completion of the degree in Human Services, graduates will be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively, including speaking, writing, and listening in order to express, transmit and interpret knowledge and ideas.
  2. Research and plan in order to search for specific knowledge and the ability to conceptualize future needs and solutions for meeting those needs.
  3. Use interpersonal skills for resolving conflict, relating to and helping people, such as empathy, genuineness, self-awareness, patience etc.
  4. Be competent in formal/informal assessment practices in order to understand the needs and interests of the participant.
  5. Be competent in defining, discussing and performing the five basic case management functions: assessment, planning,linking, monitoring and advocacy.
  6. Identify both personal and professional strengths and weaknesses and engage in appropriate self-development activities.
  7. Describe roles of the various human service professionals in providing services.
  8. Summarize the history of human services in America and identify important persons and movements
  9. Conduct both directed and non-directed interviews for the purposes of obtaining personal historical information, determining eligibility for services and conducting a mental status evaluation.
  10. Be able to demonstrate an understanding of ethical principles and apply them to professional practice.
  11. Knowledgeable of the requirements for documentation in the organization and be able to manage these requirements efficiently.
  12. Understand theoretical bases for different interventions as well as to initiate, develop and terminate interventions in a manner that enables continuous client growth.

Day/Evening program***

The Electronic Engineering Technology Program concentrates on the use of principles and theories of science, engineering and mathematics to solve technical problems in research and development, manufacturing, sales, construction and maintenance. Through the use of modern electronic laboratories, the student will become familiar with the areas of electronics, including circuit analysis, analog and digital integrated circuits, discrete semiconductor devices, electronic communications and linear operational amplifier circuits. The student will also become familiar with Objected Oriented C++ programming and embedded controllers using assembly language programming.

This program provides students with knowledge of currently established design and laboratory techniques.

The U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Statistics (BLS) reports that one of the top ten best paying jobs for individuals with an Associate's Degree is the Engineering Technician, with positive job growth at 5% expected through 2018.

2 + 2 ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY DEGREE

In addition to the general admission requirements, Electronics Engineering Technology applicants should be aware of the following criteria:

The educational objectives of the Electronic Engineering Technology Associate Degree Program are to provide students with:

  1. A broad understanding of fundamental engineering knowledge and technical skills to analyze and solve complex technical problems in the electronics industry.
  2. Proficiency in digital and analog circuit analysis, circuit design and laboratory techniques used in the electronics industry.
  3. Effective oral and written communications skills at a level of effectiveness expected in industry employees
  4. An ability to ethically and professionally perform in business and society including a respect for diversity and a need to contribute to the community.
  5. The skills needed to obtain competitively compensated entry-level positions and/or pursue admissions into programs of advanced study and/or lifelong learning.

Student Outcomes:  At the completion of the degree in Electronic Engineering Technology, graduates must demonstrate that they will be able to:

  • Utilize mathematics, physics and engineering knowledge to solve technical problems.
  • Apply analog and digital circuit design techniques to the building, testing, and maintenance of electrical/ electronic circuits.
  • Apply microcontrollers to the building, testing, operation, and maintenance of electrical/electronic circuits.
  • Analyze and interpret data to utilize for on- going research or as part of a multi-step problem.
  • Demonstrate a respect for diversity and knowledge of contemporary professional, societal, and global issues.
  • Communicate effectively in written and oral formats.
  • Function effectively on teams.
  • Understand professional, ethical, and social responsibilities.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

Other Information:
Electronic Engineering Technology Program Annual Student Enrollment (2014-2015 academic year): 52
Electronic Engineering Technology Program Annual Graduation (2013-2014 academic year): 8

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

FIRST YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
ELET121N Digital Circuits I 2 2 3
ELET131N Circuit Analysis I 3 3 4
ENGL101N College Composition 4 0 4
MATH110N Algebra and Trigonometry 4 0 4
PSYC130N Human Relations OR      
General Education Core:  Behavioral Social Science 3 0 3
        18
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
ELET132N Circuit Analysis II 3 3 4
ELET141N Electronics I 3 3 4
ENGL103N Professional Writings and Presentations 3 0 3
MATH120N Precalculus 4 0 4
CSCI175N Intermediate Programming using C++ 4 0 4
        18
SECOND YEAR
FALL SEMESTERCLLABCR
ELET250N MicroControllers 3 3 4
ELET241N Electronics II 3 3 4
HUMA230N Ethics in the Workplace 3 0 3
MATH210N Calculus I 4 0 4
PHYS130N Physics I
        19
SPRING SEMESTERCLLABCR
ELET221N Advanced Digital Circuits 3 3 4
ELET274N ELET Capstone Project 1 3 2
PHYS131N Physics II 3 3 4
ELET245N Communications Theory and/or 2 2 3
MATH211N Calculus II 4 0 4
        13-17

Total 68-72 Credits

An agreement with UNH-Manchester will allow NCC students the option of and UNH-Manchester degree in electronic engineering technology and continue their coursework at UNH-Manchester to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering technology. 

*** Accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET, Inc., http://www.abet.org

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